Monday, October 27, 2014

Broken Rib Heel Stitch

Have you ever wanted a heel stitch with more padding? I have. I created this heel stitch when designing a pair of socks for my husband. Its not hard, but since its a modification of the standard heel stitch, it takes some getting used to. So here goes, for an even number of heel stitches the pattern is as follows:

Row 1 (RS): SL1, *K1, SL1*, repeat from * to * until 1 stitch remains, K1. Row 2 (WS): SL1, *P1, K1*, repeat from * to * until 1 stitch remains, P1. Repeat rows 1 & 2 until heel flap is desired height.

As you can see row 1 follows the standard heel stitch pattern, but it changes on row 2 (the key to the extra padding). On row 2, you knit the knit stitches and purl the slipped stitches (from the previous row). This results in a column of garter between the slipped stitches, which provides the additional padding. The garter column causes heel stitch to contract more vertically than a traditional heel stitch and you may need to account for this when using it in a sock.

The end result is a heel which looks like a normal heel stitch, but provides extra padding. If done in a lighter color the purl bumps may become visible.


Prairie Willow can be found on Ravelry at noliegirl. Prairie Willow is an avid knitter and jewelry designer. My jewelry can be found at Prairie Willow Jewelry;

Photos copyright Prairie Willow Knits. .

Monday, October 20, 2014

No More Shibui Heishi

If you are a fan of Shibui Heishi, get it while you can. I found out Saturday that Shibui is discontinuing the Heishi base. The yarn is 100% silk with a rough tweedy look. I love the texture of this yarn, so I bought a bunch of it from my LYS, Purlescence Yarns. I'm planning on weaving with this yarn, but you never know.


Prairie Willow can be found on Ravelry at noliegirl. Prairie Willow is an avid knitter and jewelry designer. My jewelry can be found at Prairie Willow Jewelry;

Photos copyright Prairie Willow Knits. .

Monday, October 13, 2014

Weaving Brooks Bouquets

This weeks weaving assignment was to work with Brooks Bouquets. I discovered this little trick after a few less than perfect tries. In brooks bouquet, you use your weft to wrap around some warp threads. You pull the weft tight and move onto the next bunch of warps. The problem is holding the previous warp bundle tight. I had this little clip so I decided to try clipping the wrap to the warps before moving onto the next bundle. It worked like a charm.


Prairie Willow can be found on Ravelry at noliegirl. Prairie Willow is an avid knitter and jewelry designer. My jewelry can be found at Prairie Willow Jewelry;

Photos copyright Prairie Willow Knits. .

Monday, October 6, 2014

New Start for a Ten-Stitch Blanket

I naively started a 10-stitch blanket back in 2012. I knit a little on the blanket as I planned it to be a year-long project. Unfortunately, it became a longer term project. I picked it up again in August and have been working on it with some consistency ever since. As it turns out, its a good project to work on while I'm taking classes in weaving as its easy to pickup and put down.

Any way, I thought it was about time to document how I started the 10 stitch blanket. I didn't like the way the pattern started with a square of garter and I wanted a square blanket, so I decided to dive right into the miters. Here is what I did:

Cast on 10 using long-tailed cast on.
Row 1: WYIF SL 1 pwise, K8, yfwd SL1 pwise, turn
Row 2: WYIF SL 1, yb, K9
Row 3: WYIF SL 1 pwise, K7, yfwd SL1 pwise, turn
Row 4: WYIF SL 1 yb, K8
Row 5: WYIF SL 1 pwise, K6, yfwd SL1 pwise, turn
Row 6: WYIF SL 1 yb, K7
Row 7: WYIF SL 1 pwise, K5, yfwd SL1 pwise, turn
Row 8: WYIF SL 1 yb, K6
Row 9: WYIF SL 1 pwise, K4, yfwd SL1 pwise, turn
Row 10: WYIF SL 1 yb, K5
Row 11: WYIF SL 1 pwise, K3, yfwd SL1 pwise, turn
Row 12: WYIF SL 1 yb, K4
Row 13: WYIF SL 1 pwise, K2, yfwd SL1 pwise, turn
Row 14: WYIF SL 1 yb, K3
Row 15: WYIF SL 1 pwise, K1, yfwd SL1 pwise, turn
Row 16: WYIF SL 1 yb, K2
Row 17: K1, yfwd SL1 pwise, turn
Row 18: WYIF SL 1 yb, K1
 
The second triangle is the completion of the mitered square:
Row 1: WYIF Sl 1 pwise, K1, yfwd, sl 1 pwise, yb, turn.
Row 2: WYIF Sl 1 pwise, yb, K2.
Row 3: WYIF Sl 1 pwise, K2, yfwd, sl 1 pwise, yb, turn.
Row 4: WYIF Sl 1 pwise, yb, K3.
Row 5: WYIF Sl 1 pwise, K3, yfwd, sl 1 pwise, yb, turn.
Row 6: WYIF Sl 1 pwise, yb, K4.
Row 7: WYIF Sl 1 pwise, K4, yfwd, sl 1 pwise, yb, turn.
Row 8: WYIF Sl 1 pwise, yb, K5.
Row 9: WYIF Sl 1 pwise, K5, yfwd, sl 1 pwise, yb, turn.
Row 10: WYIF Sl 1 pwise, yb, K6.
Row 11: WYIF Sl 1 pwise, K6, yfwd, sl 1 pwise, yb, turn.
Row 12: WYIF Sl 1 pwise, yb, K7.
Row 13: WYIF Sl 1 pwise, K7, yfwd, sl 1 pwise, yb, turn.
Row 14: WYIF Sl 1 pwise, yb, K8.
Row 15: WYIF Sl 1 pwise, K8, yfwd, sl 1 pwise, yb, turn.
Row 16: WYIF Sl 1 pwise, yb, K9.
 
The third triangle is the start of a new mitered square.:
Row 1: WYIF SL 1 pwise, K8, yfwd SL1 pwise, turn
Row 2: WYIF SL 1 pwise, yb, K9
Row 3: WYIF SL 1 pwise, K7, yfwd SL1 pwise, turn
Row 4: WYIF SL 1 pwise, yb, K8
Row 5: WYIF SL 1 pwise, K6, yfwd SL1 pwise, turn
Row 6: WYIF SL 1 pwise, yb, K7
Row 7: WYIF SL 1 pwise, K5, yfwd SL1 pwise, turn
Row 8: WYIF SL 1 pwise, yb, K6
Row 9: WYIF SL 1 pwise, K4, yfwd SL1 pwise, turn
Row 10: WYIF SL 1 pwise, yb, K5
Row 11: WYIF SL 1 pwise, K3, yfwd SL1 pwise, turn
Row 12: WYIF SL 1 yb, K4
Row 13: WYIF SL 1 pwise, K2, yfwd SL1 pwise, turn
Row 14: WYIF SL 1 pwise, yb, K3
Row 15: WYIF SL 1 pwise, K1, yfwd SL1 pwise, turn
Row 16: WYIF SL 1 pwise, yb, K2
Row 17: K1 pwis, yfwd SL1 pwise, turn
Row 18: WYIF SL 1 pwise, yb, K1
 
The fourth triangle completes the second mitered square:
Row 1: WYIF Sl 1 pwise, K1, yfwd, sl 1 pwise, yb, turn.
Row 2: WYIF Sl 1 pwise, yb, K2.
Row 3: WYIF Sl 1 pwise, K2, yfwd, sl 1 pwise, yb, turn.
Row 4: WYIF Sl 1 pwise, yb, K3.
Row 5: WYIF Sl 1 pwise, K3, yfwd, sl 1 pwise, yb, turn.
Row 6: WYIF Sl 1 pwise, yb, K4.
Row 7: WYIF Sl 1 pwise, K4, yfwd, sl 1 pwise, yb, turn.
Row 8: WYIF Sl 1 pwise, yb, K5.
Row 9: WYIF Sl 1 pwise, K5, yfwd, sl 1 pwise, yb, turn.
Row 10: WYIF Sl 1 pwise, yb, K6.
Row 11: WYIF Sl 1 pwise, K6, yfwd, sl 1 pwise, yb, turn.
Row 12: WYIF Sl 1 pwise, yb, K7.
Row 13: WYIF Sl 1 pwise, K7, yfwd, sl 1 pwise, yb, turn.
Row 14: WYIF Sl 1 pwise, yb, K8.
Row 15: WYIF Sl 1 pwise, K8, yfwd, sl 1 pwise, yb, turn.
Row 16: WYIF Sl 1 pwise, yb, K9.
 
This is the completed first 2 mitered squares from my actual blanket. Its a little easier to see in orange.
We need to turn one more corner. To turn the corner, repeat one more mitered square, following the directions for the 3rd and 4th triangles. This picture shows the start of the mitered square.
The completion of the mitered square.
After completing the third mitered square, you can start knitting the first side. You will knit and attach rows until you reach the corner. Once at the corner, you will turn the corner with another mitered square.

Continue knitting the sides and turning corners until you have reached your desired size.

I'm knitting the blanket using Kauni 8/2 Effektgarn in the EX colorway. You can follow my progress at 10 Stitches to Insanity.


Prairie Willow can be found on Ravelry at noliegirl. Prairie Willow is an avid knitter and jewelry designer. My jewelry can be found at Prairie Willow Jewelry;

Photos copyright Prairie Willow Knits. The "Ten Stitch Blanket" pattern copyright by Frankie Brown..